Knitting as comfort

Thank all of you for your kind wishes this week.  Please forgive me that I haven’t responded to all of you personally, but it has been a very difficult week for us.  Bill and I have both been a little overwhelmed by the depth of our grief for Hester.  We have lost dogs before, but we’ve never felt such a sense of loss.  Perhaps it was her age – she was only 3 years old.  But I think it is more.  Sue commented that in our lifetimes we can have that one dog that really touches our hearts.  I think Hester was that dog.  Who knows what will come in the future.  There will definitely be more Corgis and I hope that we find another very special dog.  But right now it’s hard to imagine any as special as Hester.  Kirby is not making it any easier!  He wanders around the house whining, looking for her.  He keeps checking her crate to see if we just forgot to let her out.  We were very concerned about him because he stopped eating.  He’s never been a very robust eater and is a little on the thin side.  But he finally relented yesterday and we’re hoping he’s on the mend. 

My weekend with my sister had been planned in advance, so hubby encouraged me to go.  I felt a little guilty about leaving him in the quiet house with only a grieving Lhasa Apso for company, but it was good to get away.  On Saturday afternoon we both volunteered in setting up for a huge charity wine auction.  I am SO not a wine person – it was a little mind numbing to me to think that someone would pay over $1000 for a bottle of wine, that they’re not even going to drink for cryin’ out loud.  My idea of a nice wine is a chilled glass of Riunite Lambrusco.  Lorette is probably having heart palpitations – she’s tried, really she has!  But I’m glad they were willing to spend that kind of money because about $600,000 was raised for various northwest arts organizations.

After setting up, my sister changed into stunning evening wear and worked the auction, while I retired to the hotel room at the Sheraton with a bag of snacks and my knitting.  It was very comforting to bury myself in my lace.  The repetition of counting and seeing the beautiful pattern develop helped me not to dwell on our loss.  I did some swatching for the Princess Shawl, but the results were a little inconclusive.  I’m still not sure what I’m going to use.  It’s a moot issue at this point because whatever I use, the yarn will cost about $100, and that’s just not in the budget right now.  I had hoped to start around the first of the year, but that might not happen.  In the meantime, I’ve joined a Princess group on Ravelry and I’ll be following every one else’s progress.

On Sunday my sister treated me to tea at the Fairmont:

Fairmont

Hightea

Very ritzy!  Thanks sis!!

On the knitting front, the blue blob is just that – only blobbier.  There will probably be no pictures until it is done because you just can’t see anything.  And I’m not willing to try and spread it out and risk having it slide off the needles. I’m to the point where things are really starting to slow down.

For more instant gratification, I started on hubby’s Silky Wool sweater:

Silkywool

Not a great photo, I know, but I didn’t have the energy to fiddle around any more with it.  This is an Elsebeth Lavold design – I’ll get the specs for you next post.

9 thoughts on “Knitting as comfort

  1. Dorothy, Lambrusco is my one and only wine I drink; and at that only a couple of glasses a year! Knitting seems to lessen all grief for me. My thoughts are with you.

  2. I am so glad you were able to get away for a few days. I know how you and Bill are grieving. Take it slow and just let the process work. I’m glad Kirby has started eating again. Years ago we had a dog literally pine away for it’s bonded partner. Never felt so helpless in my life. We were so shaken, we didn’t get another pup for 7 years. Glad you’re knitting is going so well. That surely helps.

  3. I am saddened to read about Hester. I met you two years ago when you went to Bellingham to knit with Li B, and I have read your blog ever since. I have a dog whom I love dearly, so I very much understand your feelings. I know how much dogs can mean to a family. Hester was lucky to have had you who loved her so much.

  4. I am saddened to read about Hester. I met you two years ago when you went to Bellingham to knit with Li B, and I have read your blog ever since. I have a dog whom I love dearly, so I very much understand your feelings. I know how much dogs can mean to a family. Hester was lucky to have had you who loved her so much.

  5. Heading over to Ravelry to check out that pattern.

    I`m glad you`re back. You know, I never met Hester in person, but I feel like I did. You`ve done a good job of making her real to us, and I will remember her sweetness. I have a soft spot for long, close to the ground dogs.

    Li

  6. Seeing your Lavold pattern is making me eager to get cracking on mine (Thora). It is swatched, but not yet cast on. Although I’ve gripped about Lavold’s often inscrutable instructions, the patterns themselves are so well thought out that they’re a treat to knit.

  7. Dorothy, I will keep working on you on the wine front. Though I can’t see spending a thousand dollars on a bottle of wine, either. Even $100 for a bottle makes me cringe. $10, now we’re getting somewhere. Just think of all the yarn you could get for the $990 difference!

    Our Riley is that once in a lifetime dog for us. We try to cherish every moment we are allowed to have her in our lives. Time will ease your grief, but Hester will always be that special dog for you.

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